Microbiome SRP Seed Grant Program

Seed Grant Program

The Microbiome Special Research Program aims to facilitate interdisciplinary and innovative research in microbiome science at UC Davis through creating and fostering collaborations and communication between researchers interested in microbiome science. The seed grant is intended to create new research collaborations, and build on previously existing collaborations centered on microbiome-focused research at UC Davis. 

The call receives solicitations from all disciplines performing research in microbiome science, including but not limited to: biological sciences, engineering, agriculture, medicine, veterinary medicine, food science, soil science, and any other discipline with the potential to make clear contributions to microbiome research.

Preference will be given to proposals that:

  • Create new and interdisciplinary collaborations between researchers in different schools and colleges within UC Davis.
  • Leverage existing university resources, partnerships and collaborations.
  • Present novel topics in microbiome research at UC Davis.
  • Demonstrate sustainability of research and show a clear plan to apply for significant extramural funds.

Award Details

For each award, UC Davis Microbiome Special Research Program provides funding of up to $40,000 for the total duration of the project (up to 2 years). Smaller requests will also be considered.

Awards may be used to cover reasonable research-related travel expenses, and associated research expenses (e.g. research supplies, publication costs, etc.). Funds may not be used to cover student tuition. However, student stipends are allowed if properly justified in the narrative and budget.

The maximum duration of funding for each project is 24 months.

Eligibility

  • Proposals will only be accepted from UC Davis researchers with Principal Investigator status.
  • Applicants are permitted to submit only one application per year. Proposals may be resubmitted in subsequent funding cycles.
Application period is closed.

2018 Awards

Seven research projects were selected from a total of 30 applications covering a wide variety of disciplines:

Joanna Chiu

The Role of Gut Microbiota and Impact of Antibiotics on Cardiovascular Health

Principal investigator: Joanna Chiu, Department of Entomology and Nematology, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.

Co-principal investigator: Yang Kevin Xiang, Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine.

David Gold

The Role of Microbial Sulfate Reduction in Oyster Biomineralization: Implications for Changing Oceans

Principal investigator: David Gold, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, College of Letters and Science.

Co-principal investigators: John Stachowicz, Department of Evolution and Ecology, College of Biological Sciences and Roxanne Banker, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, College of Letters and Science.

Valentina Medici

Interactions Between Intestine Microbiota, DNA methylation, and Transcription Patterns in Mouse Models of Copper Accumulation

Principal investigator: Valentina Medici, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, School of Medicine.

Co-principal investigator: Janine LaSalle, Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, and Genome Center.

Kate Scow

The Soil Microbiome of the Perennial Grain Kernza—Relationship to Soil Carbon Sequestration and Food Quality

Principal investigator: Kate Scow, Department of Land, Air, and Water Resources, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.

Co-principal investigators: Mark Lundy, Department of Plant Sciences, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences; Carolyn Slupsky, Department of Nutrition/Department of Food Science and Technology, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences; Venkatesan Sundaresan, Department of Plant Sciences/Department of Plant Biology, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and College of Biological Sciences. 

Erkin Seker

A Microfabricated Model of Enteric Epithelium-Neuron Interaction for Identification of Effector Compounds in the Gut Microbiota

Principal investigator: Erkin Seker, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, College of Engineering.

Co-principal investigators: Maria Marco, Department of Food Science and Technology, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and Helen Raybould, Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Cell Biology, School of Veterinary Medicine. 

Andrew Whitehead

Eco-evolutionary Dynamics Between Fish Hosts and Their Microbiomes in Polluted Environments

Principal investigator: Andrew Whitehead, Department of Environmental Toxicology, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.

Co-principal investigator: Titus Brown, Department of Population Health and Reproduction, School of Veterinary Medicine, and Genome Center.

Thomas Young

Transformative Interactions Between Organic Contaminants and the Skin Microbiome

Principal investigator: Thomas Young, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, College of Engineering.

Co-principal investigators: Raja Sivamani, Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, and Deborah Bennett, Department of Public Health Sciences, School of Medicine.

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