News

#COVID19 Research at UC Davis

March 20, 2020

Great article about some of the amazing COVID19 research going on at UC Davis.  Everything from cell culture of the virus, to novel test development, to sociology.  There are people working like crazy behind the scenes to connect researchers and clinicians, find gaps in materials/manpower/funding, and bring everyone together.   Really inspiring to see all this.

 

UCD Citizen Science Project on the Tomato Seed Microbiome

March 17, 2020

What do you get when you combine UC Davis alumni, tomato seeds, and citizen science?   That would be Project GASP (“Germ”-ination Alumni Science Project).  I didn't come up with the name, I swear.   This project, sponsored and paid for by the College of Biological Sciences at UC Davis, is interested in looking at the heritability of the tomato seed microbiome.  There is a large body of research on the importance of the microbiome for the health and productivity of plants in agriculture.   There are whole companies dedicated to as

The emergence of microbiome centers

December 19, 2019

I am happy to announce the publication of a new paper from a group of people, myself included, about the "Emergence of Microbiome Centers."

Rectal Microbes Influence Effectiveness of HIV Vaccine

December 13, 2019
Microbes living in the rectum could make a difference to the effectiveness of experimental HIV vaccines, according to researchers at the University of California, Davis. The work is published Dec. 11 in the journal mSphere.  Evidence from human and animal studies with other vaccines suggests that Lactobacillus supplements can boost production of antibodies, while treatment with antibiotics can hamper beneficial immune responses, said Smita Iyer, assistant professor at the UC Davis Center for Immunology and Infectious Diseases and School of Veterinary Medicine. 

Compost, cover crops increase carbon in soil

November 28, 2019
In a 19-year study at the University of California, Davis, scientists dug six feet down in a study plot to compare changes in soil carbon in conventional, cover-cropped, and compost-added plots of corn-tomato and wheat-fallow cropping systems. Their findings showed that soil health and the importance of carbon is more complex than often realized but, with the right management, the soil is a huge natural resource where carbon can be sequestered. The implications are that the right applications not only help to slow the rapid rise of carbon in the atmosphere but foster effective sustainable agriculture.

UC Davis Researchers Are Highly Cited

November 19, 2019
Sixteen UC Davis researchers have been named in the annual Highly Cited Researchers 2019 list released by the Web of Science Group, which compiles statistics on scientific publishing. The list identifies scientists and social scientists who have published multiple papers ranking in the top 1 percent by citations in a particular field and year, over a 10-year period. 

Mapping the pathway to gut health in HIV and SIV infections

November 18, 2019
A UC Davis study found that the damaged gut lining (known as leaky gut) in monkeys infected with chronic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), an HIV-like virus, was rapidly repaired within five hours of receiving Lactobacillus plantarum bacteria.

B. infantis Reduces Intestinal Inflammation in Infants

November 05, 2019
In a recent study published in Pediatric Research, researchers have demonstrated that colonizing infants with a specific strain of probiotic bacteria --B. infantis EVC001--reduces intestinal inflammation up to 55-fold compared to infants receiving breastmilk only. The researchers on the study hypothesize that the lack of B. infantis in the gut may be at the root of the recent rise in autoimmune conditions.